3D Sculpture

3D sculptures/ model examples

Project goals

The goal of this project is for the student to produce a three dimensional scientific/anatomical/medical model. The type and role of model will entirely depend on the students own interests and access to materials or programs. The model will be a physical 3D model or a digital 3D model and despite its medium, this project will allow the student to explore medical art beyond the 2D. A physical 3D model can be made from such materials as wax, clay, resin, alginate, plaster, silicone-based materials or be 3D printed.  Digital 3D models can be made in Zbrush, Sculptris and Blender and many more 3D programs that exist and may be a precursor to the 3D printed model. Most importantly the students will create a model that has a purpose and clear audience in mind. 3D sculptures could be, but are not limited to: a facial reconstruction for a museum, a teaching aid that can be handled and taken apart, a static anatomical model, a simulation model to practice a clinical technique, an animated educational model, and an armatured model with movement.  The model will be mounted or accessable online and will be well labelled or with clear instruction on how to use it. Skills in a variety of materials, methods, programs, and concept designing will be gained by the students.

 

Project objectives

  • Learn to analyse good examples of 3D sculptures from which to benchmark own work. Emphasis on instructional impact for education.
  • Investigate the anatomy of a chosen subject and evidence understanding through sketches and text.
  • Plan the sculpture by drawing the underlying anatomy and/or components. Concept drawings of how it will work/move/be handled etc.
  • Physical 3D model
    • Understand the range and physical properties of materials used in the creation of a medical model or sculpture.
    • Understanding the various steps involved in creating the 3D piece: including impression, sculpting, mould-making, intrinsic colour mixing, casting and extrinsic colouration.
    • Confidently work in wax, clay, resin, alginate, plaster or silicone-based materials
    • Understand various custom mould-making designs including flexible and rigid moulds.

    Digital techniques

    • Confidently work in a 3D program to create a 3D model.
    • Understand the digital workflow of polygon modeling and sculpting techniques.
    • Understand digital painting and texturing and how to create texture, bump and displacement maps.
    • Produce renders of final artwork and turntable animations
    • Place the 3D model in Sketchfab for viewing online with animated labels
    • Learn the principles of 3D printing

Project Outcomes

  • An anatomically accurate 3D model/sculpture with strong educational and instructional impact.
  • Well rendered pencil illustrations of the anatomy of the sculpture.
  • Concept and planning illustrations of the sculpture.
  • Ability to self assess own work.
  • Skills in physical materials and computer programs.

Marking criteria. The marking criteria indicated here is a guide and grades are allocated in conjunction with the assessment criteria laid out under ‘Assessment Information – In-course Assessment Criteria’.

Criteria Levels of achievement
Rendering of the 3D sculpture and educational impact and clarity
(Final model only and marked out of 10 points))

• Instructional impact of model – with purpose and audience consideration
• Observation accuracy of structure and surface detail
• Skill and neatness
• User interaction considerations
• Effort given to the requirements of the project.
• Understanding and control for materials and techniques, singly and in combination

Fluent ability

9-10 points

Confident ability

7-8 points

Competent ability

5- 6 points

Basic ability

3- 4 points

Limited ability

1-2 points

Anatomical/scientific accuracy and exploration
(Final model only and marked out of 5 points)

• Anatomical accuracy
• Understanding of the anatomy in wider context as demonstrated by studies and sketches.
• Well chosen colours / textures / sculpting marks to describe tissues
• Differentiation between tissue types (normal vs. abnormal or veins vs. arteries)
• Interpretation of the underlying structures and anatomy
• Included anatomy conveys purpose of 3D model
• Size, viewpoint and orientation appropriate for this model

Excellent form and anatomical accuracy

5 points

Almost no errors in form and /or anatomical accuracy

4 points

A few errorrs in form and/or anatomical accuracy.

3 points

Some errors in form and / or anatomical accuracy.

2 points

Major errors in the form and anatomy

1 point

Presentation and attractiveness
(Includes all work/sketches and marked out of 5 points)

• Presentation neatness
• Consideration of final display – digital or physical
• Information or labelling design and effort
• Spelling on labelling
• Use of art vocabulary when discussing artworks

Excellent

5 points

Extremely good

4 points

Very Good

3 points

Good

2 points

Basic

1 point

Exploration, originality and concept
(Includes all work/sketches and marked out of 5 points)

Creativity in of model design
• Independent research and original concepts
• Understanding of the stages of the models creation
• Awareness and appreciation of the context and purpose of 3D model

Fluent ability

5 points

Confident ability

4 points

Competent ability

3 points

Basic ability

2 points

Limited ability

1 point

Level achieved from total points:
This project is marked on the four categories listed above. Once points are assigned to each category they are added up and a grade is given depending on the total points.
Distinction (20 – 25 points) Credit (19 – 15 points) High Pass (10 – 14 points Pass (5 – 9 points) Pass with Amends/ Referred for re-submission (1 – 4 points)

What to I need to bring to class?

  1. First step in initial seminars: Produce a design concept of what type of 3D sculpture you want to produce. This will entirely depend on your current skill set and access to materials or programs, or your desire to learn and experience new techniques.  Decide from the outset, the area to be studied and the purpose of your model – for example – is it a facial reconstruction for a museum, a teaching aid that can be handled and taken apart (a 3D printed heart with chambers), a static anatomical model (an anatomical wax model or digital 3D organ on sketchfab), a simulation model to practice a clinical technique (a silicone ear to demonstrate how to use a otoscope), an animated educational model (a hand model with pully flexors to show grip motion in the hand), and an armatured model with movement (such as a chiropractic spinal model).  Make initial accurate and interpretive sketches, and form a clear understanding of what it is you want to depict and for what audience. Research the anatomy, and plan the project – it could be a long process of impression moulding, casting, sculpting edits, adding locking features, and re-pouring in silicone, for example. Because of the huge variety of 3D sculptures, a lesson on the concept of 3D sculptures will provided but you must find your own collection of inspirational 3D sculptures to benchmark your work from. There will be a variety of workshops throughout the year that may be applicable and a few online tutorials can be found on the MAET website.
    1. Homework you must bring to the next seminar:
      1. Form: If in traditional medium: produce a mock up or half sized version or practice form and sizing on an armature. If digital medium: produce smaller practice meshes, looking at form, texturing, materials and rendering styles. These can be separate or part of the coursework draft.
      2. Exploration: Sketch out on paper what you want the model to show, the anatomy, the level of detail, and how it might be used. Product concept sketches if it can be interacted with.
      3. Medium development: If traditional: photograph your work, remove background and label your photograph in Adobe Illustrator. Use this as the information card presented at the assessment to accompany the final sculpture. If it can be interacted with, then provide a user guide. If digital: import your work into Sketchfab and label. Watch and follow along with online tutorial for creating 3D assets in Zbrush.
      4. Coursework draft: Draft work and draft labelling info for both traditional and digital mediums.
  2. Second step is the interim presentation: You present your finished pencil concept sketches showing your have fully understood the anatomy and defined the purpose of your model. Present a work-in-progress 3D sculpture with labelled or user guide. Supervisor and peer review of the work-in-progress will provide formative feedback to produce your final version.
    1. Homework for the next seminar:
      1. Incorporate any feedback received on the homework into your work. This work will not be marked independently at assessment, but will form part of the observation and exploratory section of the marking criteria.
      2. Complete the coursework based on feedback of the draft at seminar. Present again at following seminar for final feedback. Finish the labelling on either an information card or in sketchfab.
  3. Final step is the final presentation: Before submitting to assessment you must have it checked by the supervisor at seminars or on a designated tutoring day via email and telephone. In assessment your work will be marked according to the marking criteria of that project. You will receive a detailed feedback form after assessment.

What do I need to bring to assessment?

You must bring:

  • The final 3D sculpture. If physical, then mounted and labelled or with a user guide. If digital then in Sketchfab fully labelled.
  • Homework concept/anatomy sketches.
  • Make sure all artwork is well presented, neat and labelled.

Information on creating physical 3D sculptures of models

If you want to get into making 3D models out of soft silicone or hard resins then you will need to learn some mould making techniques, companies like Smooth-On or MouldLife make great “how-to” videos and sell cheap small packs of silicone which can help you get started.  Have a look at their You Tube channel for more information.

Zbrush tutorial – Create your first sculpt from beginning to end with Cat!

video

Details on all the Medical Artists' Education Trust projects can be found below