Pathological specimen – colour watercolour

Watercolour pathological specimen examples

Project goals

The goal of this project is for the students to produce a watercolour illustration of a pathological specimen. Through depicting the specimen in a full colour watercolour medium, the students will capture the variation of colour and texture of abnormal against normal tissue. Emphasis will be placed on contrast between the anomaly and surrounding tissue, as well as anatomical accurate observation of the subject matter.  Instructional impact of the illustration for educational reasons is paramount. To develop the students medium skills, the students will also create photorealistic swatches of various tissue types in Photoshop. The project will provide the student with skills in colour watercolour and Adobe Photoshop.

 

Project objectives

  • Learn to analyse good examples of pathological illustrations from which to benchmark your own work. Emphasis on instructional impact and focus on the differences between normal and abnormal.
  • Put into practice the principles of light on form that was taught on the foundation course.
  • Practice pencil techniques, and implement neatness and good presentation.
  • Learn the basics of colour watercolour illustrations, and develop common vocabulary relating to watercolour and of the materials used.
  • Learn anatomical terminology, related to your specimen.
  • Create pencil tonal studies of various views of your specimen, thinking of it as a three dimensional object with form and weight.
  • Investigate the anatomy of your chosen specimen and evidence your understanding through studies and text in pencil and colour watercolour. Draw a comparison studies between healthy and diseased versions of the specimen focusing on colour and texture.
  • Learn photorealistic painting in Photoshop with online tutorials.
  • Produce a full colour watercolour of a pathological specimen with clear instructional impact.

Project Outcomes

  • An anatomically accurate illustration of a pathological specimen, which shows instructional impact.
  • A collection of pencil studies of various views of the specimen, showing it as a three dimensional object with form and weight.
  • Evidence of understanding of the specimens anatomy and comparison studies of normal and abnormal.
  • Photorealistic Photoshop digital paintings from the online tutorial.
  • The ability to self assess own illustrations.
  • Mastered colour watercolour and some Photoshop skills.
  • Built upon skills in continuous tone which you learnt on the foundation course.

Marking criteria. The marking criteria indicated here is a guide and grades are allocated in conjunction with the assessment criteria laid out under ‘Assessment Information – In-course Assessment Criteria’.

Criteria Levels of achievement
Illustrations/graphics impact and clarity. Including skill in watercolour (Final colour watercolour only and marked out of 10 points)

• Instructional impact of drawing
• Observation accuracy and differentiation between structures and tissue types
• Skill and neatness of rendered illustration
• Effort given to the requirements of the project
• Understanding and control of art tools, materials and techniques, singly and in combination
• Understanding of elements, such as colour, line, texture, balance

Fluent ability

9-10 points

Confident ability

7-8 points

Competent ability

5- 6 points

Basic ability

3- 4 points

Limited ability

1-2 points

Anatomical accuracy and exploration
(Final colour watercolour only and marked out of 5 points)

• Anatomical accuracy
• Differentiation between tissue types (normal vs.
abnormal or veins vs. arteries)
• Interpretation the underlying structures and
anatomy
• Included anatomy conveys purpose of illustration
• Size, viewpoint and orientation appropriate for this illustration
• Understanding of the anatomy in a wider context as demonstrated by studies and sketches.

Excellent form and anatomical accuracy

5 points

Almost no errors in anatomical accuracy

4 points

A few errorrs in anatomical accuracy.

3 points

Some errors in anatomical accuracy.

2 points

Major errors in the anatomy or surgery

1 point

Presentation and attractiveness
(Includes all images/sketchbooks etc. and marked out of 5 points)

• Presentation neatness
• Layout consideration for the audience, and where it will be used (i.e. textbook or poster)
• Appropriate text, labelling, callouts, titles
• Spelling
• Use of art vocabulary when discussing artworks

Excellent

5 points

Extremely good

4 points

Very Good

3 points

Good

2 points

Basic

1 point

Observational and exploratory quality of the collection of dissection illustrations.
(Includes all images/sketchbooks etc. and marked out of 5 points)

• Observational skill
• Exploratory studies of various tissue types, progression of disease or variations of appearance.
• Independent research and original concepts
• Understand stages of art-making
• Awareness and appreciation of the context and
purpose of illustration

Fluent ability

5 points

Confident ability

4 points

Competent ability

3 points

Basic ability

2 points

Limited ability

1 point

Level achieved from total points:
This project is marked on the four categories listed above. Once points are assigned to each category they are added up and a grade is given depending on the total points.
Distinction (20 – 25 points) Credit (19 – 15 points) High Pass (10 – 14 points Pass (5 – 9 points) Pass with Amends/ Referred for re-submission (1 – 4 points)

Additional supporting information to accompany your project guidelines Selecting your specimen

  • Look thoroughly around the museum at all the pathology specimens and choose a good clear example to work from.
  • Do not move any specimens from the shelves without prior permission from the museum curator or a member of staff, who may wish to do this on your behalf, especially if it is in a large case or pot, ditto in reverse to return it to its original place in the museum.
  • You may choose a specimen which is a stand alone subject or you may wish to choose a piece that integrates in subject matter with one or more of your other projects.
  • You may wish or need to edit part/s of the specimens to select the area required or to eliminate unnecessary or extended parts, for example alter the dissected line in order to expose more detail or to make it more aesthetically pleasing.

Lighting of your specimen may be tricky within the museum due to the numerous light sources from around the room. Note your key light source so this can be followed through to your final artwork.

Please note: when you are drawing from a specimen, it is each student’s responsibility to gain the relevant consents. Further information may be found via the ‘National Guidelines’ link on the ‘Rules and Regulations’ page of this website. Also refer to ‘The Gordon Museum Release Form’ which accompanies this project.

Gordon Museum – Code of Conduct for Medical Drawings from Museum Specimens

  • Access is restricted to members of the college and to qualified practitioners and students of medicine, nursing or related studies, so it is essential to confirm your visit prior to arrival.
  • Visitors to the Museum must register on arrival and will be asked to show proof of identity and status (e.g. hospital ID pass, University or institution letter on headed paper with students course details etc.).
  • The museum is open 9am to 8.45pm Monday to Friday. Closed on Bank Holidays. The museum may be closed at other times including for examinations, so we always recommend that you check in advance if you are planning to visit and wish to make a booking. Admission is free for individual visitors, but donations are appreciated. We hope you enjoy using our collections. During your time studying in the museum, we ask you to adhere to our code of conduct to ensure the safety of all our visitors and our specimens.
  • If you have any questions or need any help while you are in the museum please speak to a member of museum staff, they can be reached using the phone situated at the front of the museum.
  1. Initially please check with a member of staff prior to the movement of specimens to help your study, and please do not move very large specimens or specimens labeled as fragile.
  2. Photography and filming are NOT permitted in the museum.
  3. The museum supports medical illustration, however we ask that if you illustrate any of our specimens you sign a form stating what was drawn and how they will be used. This is to comply with the regulations of the Human Tissue Authority and to ensure that the donors of our specimens remain anonymous. Please ask a member of museum staff for this form.
  4. All bags must be left in the lockers provided outside the museum. Please remove any books and other equipment from your bag if you need this.
  5. Only water is permitted in the museum (a water dispenser is present in the kitchen next to the lockers outside the museum). No other drinking fluids are allowed.
  6. Food is not permitted in the museum.
  7. Please use the alcohol hand sanitising gel before leaving the museum.

Please return all completed forms to: Mr. William G.J. Edwards, Curator, Gordon Museum, Senior Tutor and Head of Lister House, Deputy Director EMDP, Kings College London, Guy’s Campus, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine and Dental School at Guy’s, Kings + St.Thomas’ Hospital’s, St.Thomas’ Street, London SE1 9RT Gordon Museum – Medical drawing/image release form N.B. Please attach a copy of the image listed below to this form and use a new form for each individual image or artwork FORM IS ATTACHED AT THE END OF THE WORD DOC  6.Patholgy specimen

Pencil drawing artwork A

The drawing artwork A

  • First prepare a clear, keenly observed pencil drawing from direct observation.
  • Prepare this as a tonal pencil drawing in preparation for your final artwork.
  • Prepare of colour notated draft in preparation for your final artwork.
  • Take your time to observe and note the structures and specific details relating to your chosen specimen in conjunction with your anatomy reference texts.
  • Note the specimen number and case information.

Materials artwork A

  • Use good quality cartridge paper – recommend 250gms weight
  • Use sharp pencils, having a good range available from 2H, H, B, 2B, 4B

The final watercolour artwork B

The final artwork B

  • Your final artwork should be coloured as if it were a fresh specimen and not chemically changed.
  • The final artwork may be labeled and completed in Illustrator or Photoshop in combination with your watercolour artwork. Or the artwork can be entirely painted in Photoshop. This project and chosen medium should be discussed and agreed with your tutor prior to commencing. It is recommended that students do at least one full colour water colour piece, so make sure either the Pathological or Clinical appearance is in watercolour.

Materials artwork B

  • Cartridge and watercolour paper
  • Range of sharp pencils
  • Putty rubber
  • Tracing paper
  • Paints, watercolour brushes etc.
  • Illustrator or Photoshop for labelling

What to I need to bring to class?

  1. First step in initial seminars: Locate an pathological specimen at the Gordon Museum and read the specimen notes to fully understand the disease/condition and the effect on the normal anatomy. Make initial accurate and interpretive sketches, and form and draw a clear understanding of the differences between the normal and abnormal tissue. Copy the specimen notes, and obtain initial feedback on your sketches from your supervisor. A lesson on colour watercolour will be provided and you can review good examples of pathological illustrations to benchmark your work. A online tutorial on Adobe Photoshop can be found on the MAET website which will take you how to photorealistically paint anatomy. This will help develop your medium skills for your next projects.
    1. Homework
      1. Form: Pencil studies of various views of your specimen, thinking of it as a three dimensional object with form and weight. Use all of your skills and knowledge from your foundation course for this piece.
      2. Exploration: Investigate the anatomy of your chosen specimen and evidence your understanding through studies and text in pencil and colour watercolour . Draw a comparison between a healthy and this pathological version focusing on colour and texture.
      3. Medium development: Complete the homework example swatches (called ‘photorealistic swatches.psd’) in Adobe Photoshop. Follow the online video for photoshop.
      4. Coursework draft: Pencil work-in-progress of your specimen as a precursor to the final full colour watercolour version.
  2. Second step is the interim design presentation: You present your finished pencil studies of the specimen from various views, and finished studies showing your have fully understood the anatomy and pathology. Present a work-in-progress pencil drawing which will be the precursor for your final watercolour illustration. Supervisor and peer review of the work-in-progress will provide formative feedback to produce your final version.
    1. Homework for the next seminar:
      1. Incorporate any feedback received on the homework into your work and add final artwork to portfolio ready for next assessment. This work will not be marked independently at assessment, but will form part of the observation and exploratory section of the marking criteria.
      2. Complete the colour watercolour coursework of the pathological specimen based on feedback of the pencil drawing at seminar. Present again at following seminar for final feedback.
  3. Final step is the final presentation: Before submitting to assessment you must have it checked by the supervisor. In assessment your work will be marked according to the marking criteria of that project. You will receive a detailed feedback form after assessment.

What do I need to bring to assessment?

You must bring:

  • The final life sized watercolour of a pathological specimen, mounted and labelled.
  • Homework artworks which include all studies and the pencil drawings of the specimen.
  • Include a clear photograph within your portfolio of the real specimen/s you are working from, having obtained permission if required.
  • Make sure all artwork is well presented, neat and labelled.

 

 

 

Details on all the Medical Artists' Education Trust projects can be found below