MAET Syllubus

Monochrome pencil artwork - Femur bone studies

Assignment Description

Pencil tonal drawing. Application of theories of light on form is explored through continuous tone rendering of still life objects and exercises.

Assignment Objectives

  • Students will acquire an understanding of the principles of light on form and continuous tone media techniques.
  • Emphasis will be placed on direct observation of subject matter, proper lighting, instructional impact, and reproducible quality.
  • Lectures and one-on-one meetings between faculty and students will help students develop a common vocabulary relating to pencil illustration.

Resources

  • Bone collection.
  • Two complete natural bone skeletons in department
  • Live demonstration on Pencil Techniques by Joanna Cameron.

Assignment criteria

  • Pencil drawing of femur or humerus
  • Drawn from the anterior view, in the correct anatomical orientation
  • To be drawn at life size
  • Accurate observation and interpretation
  • Observation of the structure and surface detail
  • An optional extra: a study of the anterior and/or posterior view in ink line (pen) in the correct anatomical orientation, showing muscle insertions is recommended
  • This artwork is to be accompanied by sketchbook studies of the bone, relating the femur surface to surrounding bone and soft tissue structures, i.e. evidence of your study and understanding of the femurs structure

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board

Preparing Your Femur Artwork (1)

Additional supporting information to accompany your project guidelines

Materials

  • Use good quality cartridge paper – recommend 250gms weight
  • Use sharp traditional pencils, having a good range available from 2H, H, B, 2B, 4B
  • Putty rubber
  • Calipers are useful for detailed measuring, but where possible learn to draw ‘by eye’ and hand measuring with your thumb/pencil

The drawing

  • The femur pencil project is designed to follow on and compliment the drawing skills studied and developed during your Foundation Programme
  • Work on your project/bone as a ‘whole’ and build up your shading as a ‘whole’ too, which will create a much more unified finish to your completed drawing
  • Study around the subject, understanding its place within the body, its relation to neighboring bones, the muscles, the ligaments and capsules that attach to it
  • Differentiate areas by technique and tonal shading i.e. differentiate from smooth articular surfaces to distinctive ‘rougher’ areas where muscles attach for example and note direction of attaching fibers and blood vessels/foramen
  • Remember ‘reflective light’
  • Take your time to observe

Lighting

  • Lighting of your pelvis is very important, begin and keep to the same lighting point throughout your artworks and portfolio whether ever possible e.g. lit from top left. You may choose to light from the top right if you are left-handed. Whichever you choose – be consistent
  • If you are relying on daylight, then draw at the same time/place each day to avoid morning and evening shadows causing contradictions in your artwork
  • If you are relying on false lighting then place light in a consistent position for each project
  • Use daylight bulbs where possible
  • If you are using a lamp, place your lamp at a reasonable distance from your bone, because if it is too close you will find it will create unnecessarily harsh shadows. We recommend a reasonable distance in order to give you a good overall light/shadow effect across the whole bone
  • Perhaps purchase your own folding art lamp to bring with you or to use at home. For example the ‘Daylight Twist Portable lamp’ looks ideal or similar
Monochrome Watercolour and simple photoshop artwork - Scapula bone studies

Assignment Description

Watercolour and Photoshop tonal painting. Application of theories of light on form is explored through continuous tone rendering of still life objects and exercises.

Assignment Objectives

  • Students will acquire an understanding of the principles of light on form and continuous tone media techniques.
  • Emphasis will be placed on direct observation of subject matter, proper lighting, instructional impact, and reproducible quality.
  • Lectures and one-on-one meetings between faculty and students will help students develop a common vocabulary relating to watercolour and Photoshop illustration.

Resources

  • Bone collection.
  • Two complete natural bone skeletons in department
  • Live demonstration on watercolour techniques by Joanna Cameron.
  • Live demonstration on photoshop techniques by Catherine Sulzmann.

Assignment criteria

  • 1. Monochrome watercolour tonal painting
  • 2. Simple Photoshop tonal exercise, mastering layers and tonal build up
  • Drawn from the dorsal view, in the correct anatomical orientation
  • To be drawn at life size
  • Accurate observation and interpretation
  • Observation of the structure and surface detail
  • An optional extra: a study of the ventral surface in the correct anatomical orientation, showing muscle insertions is recommended
  • This artwork is to be accompanied by sketchbook studies of the bone, relating the scapula surface to surrounding bone and soft tissue structures, i.e. evidence of your study and understanding of the scapula’s structure

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board

Preparing Your Scapula Artworks (2)

Additional supporting information to accompany your project guidelines

The drawing artwork A

  • This scapula project is designed to follow on and compliment the drawing skills developed during the preparation of the femur project
  • Begin by preparing a clear and well observed pencil drawing, i.e. a detailed working drawing from which you will then be able to develop your watercolour version as a development of your skills using a different medium
  • Observe the shape of the scapula structure as a whole, considering the importance of its shape, i.e. which areas protrude forward, mid, back and those receding
  • Work on your project/bone as a ‘whole’ and build up your pencil shading as a ‘whole’ too, which will create a much more unified finish to your completed drawing

Materials artwork A

  • Use good quality cartridge paper – recommend 250gms weight
  • Use sharp traditional pencils, having a good range available from 2H, H, B, 2B, 4B
  • Putty rubber
  • Calipers are useful for detailed measuring, but where possible learn to draw ‘by eye’ and hand measuring with your thumb/pencil

1. The painting artwork B

  • This monochrome tonal painting is designed to follow on and compliment your initial pencil drawing, developing your understanding of light and shade, depth and tonal colour
  • By using a combination of your detailed pencil scapula study and continued observation directly from the bone itself, prepare a tonal watercolour version as a development of your skills by using a different medium
  • Lighting of your scapula is very important, begin and keep to the same lighting point throughout your artworks and portfolio whenever possible e.g. lit from top left. You may choose to light from the top right if you are left-handed. Whichever you choose – be consistent
  • Keep your work surface clear and clean
  • Use a clean piece of paper under your hand to prevent any greasiness transferring onto the paper which can cause the paint not to adhere properly
  • Take your time to test colours and observe the object
  • Select a single colour for use as your one tonal colour, for example Paynes grey, indigo, raw umber test and chose an appropriate and complimentary colour that will suit this project

2. Digital tonal exercise artwork C

  • This assignment is designed for you to explore and create a digital version of your scapula artwork by using the program Photoshop, mastering layers and tonal buildup

Materials artwork B

  • We recommend a minimum of two good quality professional artists range watercolour sable brushes. We recommend a minimum of two brushes – one size ten and another as either a size eight or twelve depending on your preference. One brush can be for your paint and one for blending out with clean water. If you use pans, it is important to have your paint, as hard dry paint will blunt and damage your good brushes very quickly when you try to pick up colour. Soften your pans by using a firm brush full of hot water onto your pan, if you haven’t used your paints for a week or two
  • Paints – always buy the best you can – professional quality is always preferable. These can be pans or tubes. A few of the best, is far better than numerous pans or tubes from student ranges. Also try and buy from the same range, because makes can vary
  • Porcelain paint mixer (plastic versions may stain)
  • Brush roll or wrap to protect your brushes these are cheap to buy and will prevent the brush points becoming damaged or bent. If you are a dab hand with a sewing machine, then they are very easy to make!
  • Two water containers are crucial. Use one for painting with clean water, the other just for cleaning your brush. Change the water in both as required
  • Water dropper is useful for adding water to the paint/mixer
  • Watercolour brush pens are a useful addition, being very portable
  • Paper – this can be sheets, pads or sealed pads – which don’t need stretching. Paper types can be from an extra smooth surface to a rough texture, all with different paperweights 240+lbs is a good starting weight. Try several types and see which suits your style best. Remember in future projects, you may wish to use different papers to achieve different results.
  • Make a colour chart of all the paints you wish to use. Use a small piece of white card, drawing sufficient squares for all the colours. Fill in each in turn painting each square from light to dark so you can see the colour range each one makes – label
  • Using watercolour sheets, paint block colours overlaying each in different orders – label colours used and keep for future reference i.e. red over blue, blue over red etc

Additional useful watercolour related materials

  • Masking tape
  • Tracing paper
  • Pencils, pens
  • Sponges
  • Inks
  • Card corners/view finder for sizing images
  • Paper towels/tissue

Watercolour practice

  • For future watercolour practice and projects, begin with your three primary colours : Windsor red, blue and yellow. Limit yourself to a few colours when you start, so you really get to know how to overlay these few colours to acquire experience of how your colours mix, their character and intensity

Other useful colours

  • Cadmium lemon Light red
  • Raw sienna Rose madder
  • Raw umber Cobalt blue
  • Burnt sienna Indigo
  • French ultramarine

These colours are good for their general permanence and are not prone to fading

Watercolour mediums

  • Gum Arabic a traditional binder for watercolour paint, increases gloss and transparency
  • Ox gall also a traditional additive, improves the wetting and increases colour flow
  • Impasto gel not a frequently used watercolour technique, but can stop colours running into each other
Conte artwork - Pelvis bone studies

Assignment Description

Conte pencil drawing of pelvis. Application of theories of light on form is explored through a three tone rendering of still life objects and exercises.

Assignment Objectives

  • Students will acquire an understanding of the principles of light on form and continuous tone media techniques.
  • Emphasis will be placed on direct observation of subject matter, proper lighting, instructional impact, and reproducible quality.
  • Lectures and one-on-one meetings between faculty and students will help students develop a common vocabulary relating to Conte illustration.

Resources

  • Bone collection.
  • Two complete natural bone skeletons in department
  • Live demonstration on Conte techniques by Joanna Cameron.

Assignment criteria

  • 1. Monochrome half-tone pencil preparatory drawing
  • 2. followed by a black and white or coloured conte or conte soft pencil style on toned background
  • An additional artwork describing the expanded views of the bones, combined with text information as a page spread for example
  • Drawn from the anterior view
  • To be drawn at life size
  • Accurate observation and interpretation
  • Observation of the structure and surface detail
  • It is suggested that the pelvis is lit from the top left, as this will aid your observation and drawing of the structure and creating the inner bowl of the pelvis
  • This project is to be accompanied by sketchbook studies of the bone/s, i.e. evidence of your study and understanding of their structure

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board

Preparing Your Pelvis Artwork (3)

Additional supporting information to accompany your project guidelines

The pencil drawing artwork A

  • This pelvis project is designed to follow on and compliment your drawing skills developed during the preparation of the femur and scapula projects
  • Begin by preparing a clear and well observed pencil drawing, i.e. a detailed working drawing from which you will then be able to develop your conte version as a development of your skills by using a different medium
  • Observe the shape of the pelvis structure as a whole, considering the importance of the shape, which areas are forward, mid, back and receding
  • Work on your project/bone as a ‘whole’ and build up your shading as a ‘whole’ too, which will create a much more unified finish to your completed drawing

Materials

  • Use good quality cartridge paper – recommend 250gms weight
  • Use sharp traditional pencils, having a good range available from 2H, H, B, 2B, 4B
  • Putty rubber
  • Calipers are useful for detailed measuring, but where possible learn to draw ‘by eye’ and hand measuring with your thumb/pencil

The conte drawing artwork B

  • This conte drawing project is designed to develop and compliment your initial detailed pencil drawing
  • By using a combination of your pencil drawing and continued observation directly from the bone itself, prepare a conte version as a development of your skills by using a different tonal medium
  • Lighting of your pelvis is very important, begin and keep to the same lighting point throughout your artworks and portfolio whether ever possible e.g. lit from top left. You may choose top right if you are left handed. Whichever you choose – be consistent
  • The key to this project conte project is to shade the darks and limited highlights with a light colour, allowing the colour of the paper to work as your tonal mid range. Thus not covering the whole surface with colour. Allow the paper to work for you

Materials artwork B

  • Toned background of a suitable complimentary colour e.g. soft grey, blue or similar
  • Paper use either sugar paper or pastel paper, ensuring a smooth surface
  • Conte pencils are preferable; only two are needed, select a dark complimentary colour to compliment your chosen paper and a white or off white for the highlights
  • Conte or similar materials are soft and smudge easily, so protect your working surface from your hand with paper to prevent smudges, greasiness and blurring

3.Pelvis – Pencil and conte artworks

Pen and ink - Anatomical dissection

Assignment Description

Pen and ink illustration of an anatomical dissection.

Assignment Objectives

  • This item should reflect the candidates ability to interpret and convey the underlying structures and anatomy for your chosen purpose of this illustration,i.e. are you observing the path of a particular nerve or vessel, or superficial or deep muscles relating to your chosen subject. Show differentiation between structures within your line work
  • Students will acquire an understanding of the principles of pen and ink technique and how to produce reproducible quality, and instructional impact.
  • Lectures and one-on-one meetings between faculty and students will help students develop a common vocabulary relating to pen and ink illustration.

Resources

  • Department library
  • Numerous books on pen & ink technique
  • Anatomical specimens
  • Live demonstration by Joanna Cameron.

Assignment criteria

  • This project will have two components:
    • 1. Pen and ink drawing of a dissection
    • 2. An additional version with anatomical labels prepared in Illustrator
  • Preparatory artwork may be life-size or larger.
  • Final artwork to be life size
  • To be observed and drawn from an actual dissected specimen
  • Decide from the outset, the area to be studied and purpose of your illustration i.e. is it to show muscular structure, arteries, nervous system etc.
  • Choose a specimen to which you will be able to have consistent access
  • Accurate observation and interpretation. Clear understanding and differentiation should be made between the structures for example the muscles, ligaments, bone, nerves and vessels
  • Plan this project initially by using the underlying skeleton. First prepare drawings to show your full understanding of the bony structure within, before building and progressing to the other anatomical structures revealed on your chosen dissection
  • This is to be accompanied by sketchbook studies i.e. evidence of your study and understanding of the dissected specimen
  • Include a copy of the specimen notes, which describe your anatomical dissection and/or reference material if these are available

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board

Preparing Your Anatomical Dissection Artwork (5)

Additional supporting information to accompany your project guidelines Selecting your specimen

  • Look thoroughly around the museum at all the anatomy specimens and choose a good clear example to work from
  • Do not move any specimens from the shelves without prior permission from the museum curator or a member of staff, who may wish to do this on your behalf, especially if it is in a large case or pot, ditto in reverse to return it to its original place in the museum
  • You may choose a specimen which is a stand alone subject or you may wish to choose a piece that integrates in subject matter with one or more of your other projects
  • You may wish or need to edit part/s of the specimens to select the area required or to eliminate unnecessary or extended parts, for example alter the dissected line in order to expose more detail or to make it more aesthetically pleasing
  • Lighting of your specimen may be tricky within the museum due to the numerous light sources from around the room. Note your key light source so this can be followed through to your final artwork
  • Choose a piece that shows muscles, tendons, vessels and nerves
  • We recommend you choose a hand, foot, leg, hip or similar specimen. Your specimen choice needs to be agreed with your tutor prior to commencing. Head dissections have sometimes been chosen but these may not always be consistently available and patient identity may also be an issue.
  • Remember to consider what is the purpose of this artwork?
  • Even if you show all of the structures within your artwork, consider which you will select for annotation purposes. Which will you annotate? You may for example annotate just the superficial muscles, just the deep muscles, all the muscles, the vessels and/or nerves. We recommend final annotation be completed within Illustrator or PhotoshoP

The drawing artwork A

  • Prepare a clear, keenly observed pencil drawing from direct observation
  • Prepare this as a tonal pencil drawing in preparation for your final artwork
  • Prepare of colour notated draft in preparation for your final artwork
  • Prepare a noted draft of the structures to be annotated
  • Take your time to observe and note the structures and specific details relating to your chosen specimen in conjunction with your anatomy reference texts
  • Note the specimen number and case information

Materials artwork A

  • Use good quality cartridge paper – recommend 250gms weight
  • Use sharp traditional pencils, having a good range available from 2H, H, B, 2B, 4B
  • Putty rubber

The final artwork artwork B

  • Your final artwork should be coloured as if it were a fresh specimen and not chemically changed. Vessels and nerves etc. may be coloured with the traditional recognised palette found within published texts etc.

Materials artwork B

  • Cartridge and watercolour paper
  • Range of sharp pencils
  • Putty rubber
  • Tracing paper
  • Paints, watercolour brushes etc. see information on project 2

 

Gordon Museum – Code of Conduct for Medical Drawings from Museum Specimens

  • Access is restricted to members of the college and to qualified practitioners and students of medicine, nursing or related studies, so it is essential to confirm your visit prior to arrival
  • Visitors to the Museum must register on arrival and will be asked to show proof of identity and status (e.g. hospital ID pass, University or institution letter on headed paper with students course details etc.)
  • The museum is open 9am to 8.45pm Monday to Friday. Closed on Bank Holidays. The museum may be closed at other times including for examinations, so we always recommend that you check in advance if you are planning to visit and wish to make a booking. Admission is free for individual visitors, but donations are appreciated. We hope you enjoy using our collections. During your time studying in the museum, we ask you to adhere to our code of conduct to ensure the safety of all our visitors and our specimens
  • If you have any questions or need any help while you are in the museum please speak to a member of museum staff, they can be reached using the phone situated at the front of the museum
  1. Initially please check with a member of staff prior to the movement of specimens to help your study, and please do not move very large specimens or specimens labeled as fragile
  2. Photography and filming are not permitted in the museum
  3. We support medical illustration, however we ask that if you illustrate any of our specimens you sign a form stating what was drawn and how they will be used. This is to comply with the regulations of the Human Tissue Authority and to ensure that the donors of our specimens remain anonymous. Please ask a member of museum staff for this form
  4. All bags must be left in the lockers provided outside the museum. Please remove any books and other equipment from your bag if you need this
  5. Only water is permitted in the museum (a water dispenser is present in the kitchen next to the lockers outside the museum).No other drinking fluids are allowed
  6. Food is not permitted in the museum
  7. Please use the alcohol hand sanitising gel before leaving the museum.

Please return all completed forms to: Mr. William G.J. Edwards, Curator, Gordon Museum, Senior Tutor and Head of Lister House, Deputy Director EMDP, Kings College London, Guy’s Campus, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine and Dental School at Guy’s, Kings + St.Thomas’ Hospital’s, St.Thomas’ Street, London SE1 9RT Gordon Museum – Medical drawing/image release form N.B. Please attach a copy of the image listed below to this form and use a new form for each individual image or artwork FORM IS ATTACHED AT THE END OF THE WORD DOC   5. Anatomical Dissection

Full colour watercolour - Pathological dissection

Assignment Description

Full colour watercolour, gouache or acrylic (watercolour based medium) of a pathological specimen.

Assignment Objectives

  • This artwork should reflect the candidate’s ability to interpret the difference between normal and pathological structure and/or tissues.
  • Students will acquire an understanding of the principles of colour watercolour – creating realistic form, observation of color, color matching methods, depicting texture.
  • Using a 6-color palette, create variety of mixed color swatches
  • Lectures and one-on-one meetings between faculty and students will help students develop a common vocabulary relating to watercolour illustration.

Resources

  • Specimen collection at Gordon’s museum or pathology museum.
  • Department library: numerous books on watercolor painting.
  • Live demonstration on water colour techniques by Joanna Cameron.

Assignment criteria

  • To be drawn at life size
  • Direct observation of the gross appearance of a pathological specimen
  • Accurate observation and interpretation. Emphasis if necessary, the difference between the normal and pathological structure/tissues. To provide maximum information within your illustration, you may find it necessary to restore (where needed) original texture, colour and/or shape
  • This is to be accompanied by sketchbook studies i.e. evidence of your study and understanding of the dissected specimen
  • Include a copy of the specimen notes, which describe your anatomical dissection and/or reference material if these are available

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board

Preparing Your Pathology Specimen Artwork (6) 

Additional supporting information to accompany your project guidelines

Selecting your specimen

  • Look thoroughly around the museum at all the pathology specimens and choose a good clear example to work from
  • Do not move any specimens from the shelves without prior permission from the museum curator or a member of staff, who may wish to do this on your behalf, especially if it is in a large case or pot, ditto in reverse to return it to its original place in the museum
  • You may choose a specimen which is a stand alone subject or you may wish to choose a piece that integrates in subject matter with one or more of your other projects
  • You may wish or need to edit part/s of the specimens to select the area required or to eliminate unnecessary or extended parts, for example alter the dissected line in order to expose more detail or to make it more aesthetically pleasing

Lighting of your specimen may be tricky within the museum due to the numerous light sources from around the room. Note your key light source so this can be followed through to your final artwork

The drawing artwork A

  • Prepare a clear, keenly observed pencil drawing from direct observation
  • Prepare this as a tonal pencil drawing in preparation for your final artwork
  • Prepare of colour notated draft in preparation for your final artwork
  • Take your time to observe and note the structures and specific details relating to your chosen specimen in conjunction with your anatomy reference texts
  • Note the specimen number and case information

Materials artwork A

  • Use good quality cartridge paper – recommend 250gms weight
  • Use sharp pencils, having a good range available from 2H, H, B, 2B, 4B
  • Putty rubber

The final artwork artwork B

  • Your final artwork should be coloured as if it were a fresh specimen and not chemically changed
  • The final artwork may be labeled and completed in Photoshop in combination you’re your watercolour artwork or solely as a Photoshop artwork. This project and chosen medium should be discussed and agreed with your tutor prior to commencing

Materials artwork B 

  • Cartridge and watercolour paper
  • Range of sharp pencils
  • Putty rubber
  • Tracing paper
  • Paints, watercolour brushes etc. see information for project 2

Gordon Museum – Code of Conduct for Medical Drawings from Museum Specimens

  • Access is restricted to members of the college and to qualified practitioners and students of medicine, nursing or related studies, so it is essential to confirm your visit prior to arrival
  • Visitors to the Museum must register on arrival and will be asked to show proof of identity and status (e.g. hospital ID pass, University or institution letter on headed paper with student’s course details etc.)
  • The museum is open 9am to 8.45pm Monday to Friday. Closed on Bank Holidays. The museum may be closed at other times including for examinations, so we always recommend that you check in advance if you are planning to visit and wish to make a booking. Admission is free for individual visitors, but donations are appreciated. We hope you enjoy using our collections. During your time studying in the museum, we ask you to adhere to our code of conduct to ensure the safety of all our visitors and our specimens
  • If you have any questions or need any help while you are in the museum please speak to a member of museum staff, they can be reached using the phone situated at the front of the museum
  1. Initially please check with a member of staff prior to the movement of specimens to help your study, and please do not move very large specimens or specimens labeled as fragile
  2. Photography and filming are not permitted in the museum
  3. We support medical illustration, however we ask that if you illustrate any of our specimens you sign a form stating what was drawn and how they will be used. This is to comply with the regulations of the Human Tissue Authority and to ensure that the donors of our specimens remain anonymous. Please ask a member of museum staff for this form
  4. All bags must be left in the lockers provided outside the museum. Please remove any books and other equipment from your bag if you need this
  5. Only water is permitted in the museum (a water dispenser is present in the kitchen next to the lockers outside the museum). No other drinking fluids are allowed
  6. Food is not permitted in the museum
  7. Please use the alcohol hand sanitising gel before leaving the museum.

Please return all completed forms to: Mr. William G.J. Edwards, Curator, Gordon Museum, Senior Tutor and Head of Lister House, Deputy Director EMDP, Kings College London, Guy’s Campus, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine and Dental School at Guy’s, Kings + St.Thomas’ Hospital’s, St.Thomas’ Street, London SE1 9RT Gordon Museum – Medical drawing/image release form N.B. Please attach a copy of the image listed below to this form and use a new form for each individual image or artwork FORM IS ATTACHED THE THE BOTTOM OF THIS WORK DOC 6.Patholgy specimen

 

Clinical appearance

Assignment Description

Full colour watercolour, gouache or acrylic (watercolour based medium) of a a superficial clinical appearance.

Assignment Objectives

  • This artwork should reflect the candidates ability to directly observe and depict a superficial clinical appearance. This manifestation of disease could be for example, a skin lesion or physical deformity.
  • The item should reflect the candidate’s ability to interpret the difference between normal and clinical superficial appearance.
  • Students will acquire an understanding of the principles of colour watercolour – creating realistic form, observation of color, color matching methods, depicting texture.
  • Using a 6-color palette, create variety of mixed color swatches
  • Lectures and one-on-one meetings between faculty and students will help students develop a common vocabulary relating to watercolour illustration.

Resources

  • Specimen collection at Gordon’s museum or pathology museum.
  • Department library: numerous books on watercolor painting.
  • Live demonstration on water colour techniques by Joanna Cameron.

Assignment criteria

  • To be drawn at life size
  • Direct observation of the gross appearance of a pathological specimen
  • Accurate observation and interpretation.
  • If you are illustrating a sequential change within a series of artworks, then retain a continuity of style an accurate comparison between one stage an another. Some underlying anatomy may be included, if it is relevant to the condition.
  • This is to be accompanied by sketchbook studies i.e. evidence of your study and understanding of the dissected specimen
  • Include a copy of the specimen notes, which describe your anatomical dissection and/or reference material if these are available

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board
Patient positioning

Assignment Description

Series of illustrations demonstrating patient positioning – medium of candidate’s choice

Assignment Objectives

  • This artwork should reflect the candidate’s ability draw realistic illustrations of the human form in various positions
  • Students will be offered to work in a variety of mediums and this will assist in their understanding of artworks edibility and how their choice of medium can affect the final artwork

Resources

  • Department library
  • Live demonstration in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop with Catherine Sulzmann.

Assignment criteria

  • This project may be completed in a medium of your choice.
  • This artwork may be presented as a traditional or digital artwork. Either in colour, b/w or line, with or without the use of tints
  • Each illustration to be maximum size A4
  • To be drawn as realistic illustrations of the human form
  • Patient positioning for surgical and/or medical procedures
  • This project may be a single artwork or presented as a series of illustrations demonstrating the positioning of a patient for either an operative, radiological or clinical procedure. This may also include subjects such as manipulative procedures e.g. physiotherapy or osteopathy

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board
Surgical sequence

Assignment Description

Illustration of surgical procedures for medical education. The illustrations can be prepared for publication, presentation, patient education, or use on the web.

Assignment Objectives

  • Describe common surgical procedures with related anatomical structures.
  • Arrange layout of images and prepare digital files to specific formats for publication, projection or the internet.
  • Determine concise word story including labels and leader lines.
  • Complete illustrations in line, continuous tone, and or colour in a variety of styles.
  • Utilize technical and mechanical illustration equipment when necessary.

Resources

  • Department library
  • Contacts for surgeons

Assignment criteria

  • Avoid life threatening procedures and cases that are performed infrequently. For example choose appendectomy, of which there will be many consistent cases performed, and you will be able to attend more than once. Theatre Guidelines and Protocol are included in the next section of your pack.
  • Artworks to be completed in line, continuous tone, and or color in a variety of styles
  • To be prepared as either traditional or as digital artworks
  • It should contain a minimum of six illustrations. Any insets will be considered as your own additional artworks, and not part of the minimum six required
  • Prepare your illustrations to work consistently within a column width (discuss this with your tutor, so that it will be appropriate for your chosen subject), and prepare the final illustrations one third larger
  • These drawings must be based on your own direct observation from your operating theatre visits/sessions. You are encouraged to attend several different theatre subjects during your course for experience
  • Sketchbook studies drawn at the time must be produced and included within your portfolio
  • It is suggested that you prepare a half tone pencil sketch of each stage prior to beginning your final artworks. This will be beneficial in observing the appearance of your artworks, before completing the final stage

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board

Preparing For Your Surgical Artwork Sequence and Theatre Protocol

Attending and applying for surgery attendance

Firstly ensure you gain permission for your student/work experience within theatre from the surgeon and hospital to attend the procedure, supplying all required forms in advance. From each relevant health/hospital establishment you will be required to complete the following:

  1. Summary-Work experience application processSupervisor wishing to accept a student familiarise himself/herself with the Trust policy and downloads necessary forms/documents from the internet (see example staff referral form 1)
  2. The supervisor sends the forms to the student
  3. The student submits completed documentation and supporting documents to their supervisor:
  • Completed application form (see example 2)
  • Proof of MMR vaccination
  • Occupational Health declaration form (see example 3)
  • Read TB leaflet (see example 4)
  1. The supervisor completes staff referral form available from the intranet and submits it together with student’s paperwork to their work experience department. Incomplete forms/paperwork will not be accepted
  2. The Public Health team assess student’s suitability and perform necessary clearances
  3. Once the student’s Occupational Health is cleared, the student is emailed confirmation of placement
  4. Day one of placement- student reports to work placement supervisor as per confirmation email and together they discuss the planned activities and carry out the local induction
  5. End of placement – student and work placement supervisor hold de-briefing discussion
  6. Follow up – the Public Health team email the student work experience / work shadowing evaluation form

Before you leave home, make sure that you –

  • Take a copy of your permissions from the surgeon/hospital with you when attend surgery
  • Photographs – ensure you have permission from the surgeon if you wish to take photographs and importantly obtain patient consent prior to attending. It will be difficult to obtain this if left until the day of the surgery
  • Pencils – take several sharp pencils with you, do not use retractable pencils
  • Use biros if possible, to avoid broken pencil lead tips flying off.
  • Avoid pencil sharpeners and rubbers- impractical and too much mess
  • Use sketch books A4 or smaller
  • Use spiral bound notebooks if possible, so pages can’t fall out onto the floor
  • Wear easily changeable clothes
  • Wear or take a pair of socks (cotton) with you, as you may have to wear theatre shoes, which belong to someone else
  • Take a hair clip or tie long hair back
  • Take a safety pin or two, in case the scrubs (theatre trousers and top) are too big!
  • Do not wear any jewelry including watches, rings and earrings
  • Remove nail polish and do not wear nail extensions
  • Drink and eat something before you go, don’t go into theatre thirsty or on an empty stomach

Summary

  • Obtain relevant permissions
  • Spare clean socks
  • Safety pins
  • Hair ties
  • Remove jewelry and makeup
  • Art Equipment Pens or pencils
  • A4 or A5 spiral bound notepad
  • Camera
  • Ipad

On the day 

  • Be on time!
  • Arrive in plenty of time before the surgery begins taking into account that you will have to change clothes and find your way around
  • On arrival please report to the reception staff giving them the details of the surgeon who is expecting you and in which theatre you will be working in – if you have that information.  Provide them with a copy of your student authorisation if required.  You may need to sign in
  • Ask the reception staff to show you to the changing rooms, toilets etc. and where to get your scrubs
  • Double check with the reception staff which entrance and exit to use going to and from the changing rooms whilst in scrubs as sometimes they are different due to infection control
  • When choosing your scrubs, find a set that has pockets.  Also pick up a mask and hat ensuring that all your hair is covered under the hat. The shoes are usually kept in a box in the changing rooms
  • Only take into theatre your absolute essentials and do not take any food or drinks and no mobile phones. Lockers are usually available, but not always – so leave any unnecessary valuables and items at home
  • When you arrive in theatre, introduce yourself to one of the nurses and ask them to let the surgeon know that you are there.  Sometimes it is useful if you look out for a theatre nurse who isn’t as busy and wearing full theatre scrubs and tries to stick with them in case you need anything
  • Ask one of the nurses where the best place for you to stand would be
  • Do not touch anything that is green and keep your sketchbook away from the operating table and the patient. When just observing, keep your hands behind your back
  • Try to stay around the outside of the room and find a vantage point where there is a good view without disturbing anyone else. Sometimes this can be difficult, as some more complex operations tend to have more people observing

Summary

  • Eat breakfast
  • Be on time
  • Have correct permissions with you
  • Know the name of the surgeon you are joining
  • Know the procedure
  • Change into scrubs
  • Introduce yourself in theatre
  • Keep clear of anything green
  • Keep clear of staff

Additional Information – Theatre Guidelines and Protocol

  • If available, make use of a small metal stool/step in theatre, this will allow you to stand fractionally higher behind the surgeon so you can obtain a better view. A point of warning: don’t allow other individual’s trainee nurse, medical students or staff to stand on the same stool. If they do and don’t give you warning that they are stepping off the stool, you risk having your center of gravity altered with the risk you might fall forward against the surgeon or worse against the patient
  • Stand clear from the lights
  • Ask before hand if you would like your surgeon to talk you through the surgery or if you can ask him any questions during the procedure
  • Once surgery has begun, if you feel unwell or faint, leave immediately but do try and quietly tell one of the nurses that you are leaving the room and why. Go and find somewhere to recover or get some fresh air.  If you feel well enough to return let the same nurse know that you have returned
  • If there is an emergency during the surgery, stand against one of the walls out of the way or it may be that you are asked to leave
  • Once surgery has finished, return to the changing rooms leaving the scrubs in the appropriate wash bins.  Hats and masks may be disposed of
  • When leaving theatre let the reception staff know that you are leaving; signing out may be necessary
  • Take all your possessions with you

Summary

  • Use a stool if available
  • One stool per person
  • Be careful and stand clear of all equipment
  • Ask beforehand for surgeon to talk you through procedure
  • If you feel unwell, leave immediately
  • Change, place scrubs etc. in correct bins
  • Sign out if applicable
  • Take your possessions with you

Preparing Your Artworks

  • Know the procedure name that you will be observing
  • If this is your first visit to surgery, then plan only to be an observer – just stand and observe the whole process from beginning to end
  • Preferably, visit the same procedure several times before you start drawing
  • Research your procedure, read text
  • Study the anatomy of the area beforehand, familiarise yourself with all the structures; so if the surgeon refers to a specific muscle or nerve – you are not taken by surprise!
  • When you are ready, take your drawing equipment in with you
  • Ask if the surgeon can talk you through the procedure whilst in surgeryConsiderations when preparing your drawings
  • BE CONSISTENT!
  • If you draw one patient from their right side and the next from their left – mark this on your notes, especially if you amalgamate drawings over several visits and over several patients
  • Note the patient’s position before surgery begins, once the patient is covered in drapes this is sometimes rather difficult to interpret. Ultimately you may only be observing through a small square hole in the drapes, so you need to know the patient’s orientation from the start
  • Take as many notes and drawings that you feel comfortable with. It is easier to edit your drafts, but not so easy to add in steps later on that you haven’t drawn
  • Use a camera/phone/Ipad for reference if you have permission
  • Photograph any specific instruments afterwards and in the angle that they were used. These are so often very difficult to draw accurately if most is obscured within the patient and/or within the surgeons gloved hands
  • Compiling your sequence of drawings
  • BE CONSISTENT!
  • The patient’s position is the important first illustration. This need only be a small drawing or an ‘insert’ artwork, but this underpins the whole sequence that follows
  • Note carefully the incision line or key holes
  • Note their relation to any key anatomical structures or bony landmarks
  • Throughout the sequence, remember the surgeons are wearing gloves at all times – avoid drawing beautiful fingernails!
  • Sketch the sequence of events – what were the important points to noteNote the important steps: for example from the initial incision, retraction of muscles, careful note of nerves and vessels etc.  Was anything divided or removed?
  • Often some of the most vital parts happen very quickly and may be hidden from view
  • Ensure vital parts are included – discuss with your surgeon
  • Avoid being a slave to photographs – use your drawings from direct observation whenever possible.
  • As the artist you can edit, change the angle, remove unnecessary hands etc. and show the focus of the procedure. For example if you can see four pairs of hands in the photograph, are they all necessary in your final drawing?
  • After the first drawing, you may ‘home in’ for the next step
  • Use inserts to illustrate small but important steps
  • Think of the story for these artworks – will need a beginning, middle and an end. Show the sequence to someone – can they understand what is happening? Could someone perform the operation from your drawings?
  • Prepare your drawings to be appropriate for their audience – who are these drawings being prepared for? Is this for patient information, home information text or a technical surgical text?
  • Show your drafts drawings to your surgeon and tutor before proceeding to the artworks
  • Be consistent with the light source within your artworks -you are the artist, change these if need be
  • In your final artworks, consider where it will be finally published, how will they print, so consider line weight, text and colours

Summary

  • Be consistent
  • Research your subject
  • Record patient’s position and incisions
  • Tell the story in clear steps, can it be followed logically
  • Who is your audience?
  • Use your drawings from direct observation
  • Edit your information
  • Alter where necessary – you are the artist – enjoy the process!

Surgical Sequence Additional Project Information 2.Example Work Experience Form 1.Example Staff Referral Form for work experience 3.Example Occupational Health Form 4.TB leaflet

 

 

Conceptual illustration

Assignment Description

Illustration demonstrate scientific information of a conceptual nature e.g. metabolic or a physiological process in a readily understood form, the information being presented in an imaginative and creative way

Assignment Objectives

  • An introduction to conceptual thinking and visualization and its place in medical editorial and advertising markets.
  • Create an effective conceptual, informative, and eye-catching illustration.
  • This assignment will ask students to think constructively about conceptual topics relating to medicine and present them in an illustrative way. Visual thinking and brainstorming sessions will aid the students in this assignment.

Resources

  • Department library
  • Reference material – examples of previous students conceptual pieces.

Assignment criteria

  • This may be prepared in the medium of your choice, a 3D digital piece for example
  • Maximum size A3
  • We recommend that you use a current research image and suggest recreating a front cover for example. Your project will demonstrate scientific information of a conceptual nature e.g. metabolic or a physiological process in a readily understood form, the information being presented in an imaginative and creative way
  • It is suggested that this topic can often be linked and sourced to one of the subjects you are already studying
  • This project should include all the relevant research and study material within your presentation portfolio and the sources referenced where applicable
  • Students will mock-up magazine cover for final presentation.

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board

 

Technical illustration

Assignment Description

Technical illustration of surgical instrument, medical apparatus or equipment, in candidate’s choice of medium

Assignment Objectives

  • This item should reflect the candidate’s ability to interpret different surfaces and materials

Resources

  • Department library
  • Contacts for surgeons

Assignment criteria

  • This artwork may be presented as a traditional line artwork, a digital line or digital 3D piece
  • The artwork may include a surgical instrument, medical apparatus or equipment developed as a separate artwork from one observed from the surgical sequence
  • Your artwork size should to be discussed with your tutor on an individual basis, depending upon the surgical instrument that you choose
  • This illustration is to be prepared in three-point perspective
  • Indicate clearly the purpose of the instrument, and its structure i.e. the blade, teeth, ridges, levers and clamps

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of sketches
  • Final assessment by examining board
3D medical sculpture - traditional or digital

Assignment Description

Create a 3D medical model or sculpture, digitally or traditionally

Assignment Objectives

Traditional technique

  • Understand the range and physical properties of materials used in to create a medical model or sculpture
  • Understand the various steps involved in creating the 3D piece: including impression, sculpting, mold-making, intrinsic color mixing, casting, and extrinsic coloration
  • Confidently work in wax, clay, resin, alginate, plaster or silicone-based materials
  • Understand various custom mold-making designs including flexible and rigid moulds

Digital technique

  • Confidently work in a 3D program to create the 3D model
  • Understand the digital workflow of polygon models and sculpting techniques
  • Understand digital painting and texturing and how to create texture, bump and displacement maps
  • Produce renders of final artwork and turn table animations for assessment

Resources

  • Video tutorials on the student black board.
  • Books and online resources
  • Live demonstration by Catherine Sulzmann and Clare Rangeley.

Assignment criteria

  • 3D medical model or sculpture, digital or traditional
  • The physical medical model could be for teaching a surgical or clinical technique, and the digital or physical sculpture could be representing anatomy or a pathology.
  • Your chosen medium for the physical model should be suitable for the subject, for example wax, clay or cast
  • To be life size
  • Accurate observation and interpretation
  • Observation of the structure and surface detail
  • All candidates choice projects will include the relevant research and study material within your portfolios and the sources referenced where applicable

Assignment Evaluation

  • 1:1 faculty-student interface
  • Interim class critiques
  • Review of 3D model
  • Final assessment by examining board

 

Scientific Poster
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Patient leaflet
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Interactive program
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Website presentation
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Other medical or biological artwork
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Dissertation
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Life drawing
We recommend all students attend life drawing classes alongside your MAET studies throughout your course.

  • These sessions are to be in addition to any surface anatomy and/or life drawing sessions arranged within the MAET postgraduate programme
  • A variety of courses, classes and drop in sessions are available countrywide and we recommend that you enroll in a class close by and convenient to where you live; thereby you can arrange to attend as a regular commitment
  • For your Final Examination, you will be required to include a minimum of two mounted pieces of life drawing undertaken during your time enrolled on this postgraduate programme, alongside your collated portfolio studies
  • Each student is responsible for organising, financing and travelling to and from their chosen life drawing classes

Life Drawing (7)

Additional supporting information to accompany your project guidelines

  • Alongside your MAET studies, each student is required to attend regular life drawing classes 
  • Build sketchbooks and artworks collated to build a good portfolio combining short and quick studies for example
  • Collate drawings in different styles and mediums, concentrating on form, structure, proportion and anatomical details and accuracy, for example develop and consider the following throughout your study progression:
  • Contour drawings
  • Quick flash drawings
  • Modeled drawings
  • Movement and action
  • Single figures
  • Group of figures
  • Composition of figure/s
  • Add weight and mass to the figures
  • Consider light and shade
  • Draw whole or parts of the figures
  • Proportion
  • Nude and clothed figures
  • Study of skeleton and anatomy
  • Studies beginning in pencil, to inks, to conte, to charcoal, to pen an wash, to watercolour, to oils
  • Consider comparative animal anatomy
  • A selection of your life drawing pieces will be chosen by your tutor to be formally mounted and presented as part of your Final Examination display, alongside your sketchbook studies

 

 

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